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CONFIDENTIAL CHAT

In the early 1970s, outreach to clients, to the local community and to other professionals formed significant parts of the Drug Information Centre’s work. By 1975, funders were also demanding such collaboration. One major initiative was The House. Opening in June 1973 at 635 4 Ave N. E., The House provided a group-living experience for teenagers...

Image: From a 1972 newspaper. At the end of 1971, the Drug Information Centre (DIC) continued at its original location, operating 24/7. Education, crisis support and counselling regarding drug issues remained the main goals. Policy decisions were arrived at through group discussion. A grant of $2,000 from Junior League supported the library, with the rest of...

While smoking dope and ‘finding themselves,’ Canadian youth were crossing the country in large numbers during the late 1960s and early 70s. It was a lifestyle most cities and towns were unprepared to deal with. Social supports were slowly being put into place, but never without controversy. To enable a large-scale professional discussion of this problem,...

Although it was the general concern for youth encountering the drug culture that prompted the original Drug Advisory committee members to come together, there was a much more pressing issue for the larger Calgary community. Sex, drugs and rock and roll would be infecting McMahon Stadium on July 4 and 5th of 1970, by way...

Pictured: The Drug Information Centre logo. Distress Centre got its start in 1970 as the Drug Information Centre (DIC). It came to life at a time when psychedelic drugs and cannabis were emerging concerns, along with other street drugs, the misuse of legal drugs, and alcohol. “Calgary was a sleepy town. In Vancouver, drugs had been around...

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